What did CAPP and PREP providers think about the 2019 BWIAH Provider Meeting?

We crunched the numbers on your evaluation of the 2019 BWIAH Provider Meeting. Here’s what the 50+ CAPP and PREP providers who answered these questions had to say:

You were kind to us about registration.

We didn’t need evaluations to know that the registration process needs a new approach – but you were remarkably tolerant!

You liked the Albany Capital Center.

94% of those who answered this question agreed that the Albany Capital Center worked well as the event venue. There was one caveat that was probably mentioned more than any other comment: it was too cold. A few people who were unable to stay nearby missed the convenience of having it at a hotel or at least having the event within walking distance. The inexpensive parking was appreciated.

You were happy that food was provided this year, though it should have included protein options at breakfast, coffee and tea in the afternoon, and water in each room.

Structure & Timing

While some loved the start and end times, others did not. Some of you would lengthen the event overall while others would shorten it; some wanted longer workshops and others wanted shorter ones.

But certain messages came through clearly: Build in more breaks! Having two working lunches was really too much, and Day One was long and packed. The networking reception was a highlight for many participants, but it came at the end of a long day. Many of you would have liked more time for networking.

Content

  • We heard many positive comments on the keynotes—particularly Amy Cunningham’s talk on self-care. Some did not like the political slant of Loretta Ross’s presentation, but overall, most of you were happy with the keynotes.
  • Workshops could have been more interactive – there was too much sitting. Many people were happy with the range of topics, and many of the workshops got high marks.
  • The CAPP and PREP provider group meeting was another highlight. Many of you loved the discussion and would have liked to have more of it.

Let’s cut to the chase. Was it a good use of your time?

YES. The vast majority of those who responded to this question
– 98% – agreed that it was time well spent. One person was neutral and several people who completed other questions skipped this one. Either they were unsure or just didn’t want to hurt our feelings!

It makes a difference!

We anticipate being able to offer another Provider Meeting in 2020 or 2021. Rest assured your feedback is already helping us make changes for the next event. Our thanks go to everyone who took the time to complete the evaluations—it DOES make a difference!

If you have anything to add about the 2019 Provider Meeting or the kind of event you would like to see in the future, please let us know in the comments!

Karen Schantz

~ Karen

Educators: How confident are you with sex ed content?

How much do you know about the menstrual cycle and fertility? How about the way different contraceptives work? Do you know how the major STDs affect the body? Can you explain the difference between sex and gender? Many CAPP and PREP projects are based in organizations that do not specialize in human sexuality. If you are not sure that you could comfortably and confidently answer a wide range of questions on sexual health, you may want to take advantage of the many resources available for your professional development.

Assessment

Self-assessment is an excellent place to start. Healthy Teen Network has developed a self-assessment tool (PDF) for sexual health educators, much of it focused on content. Rate yourself so that you have a good sense of where your weaker areas are – the content areas where you could use a booster.

In-Person Training

Planned Parenthood of NYC Training Institute
A wide variety of topics are offered in PPNYC’s Training Institute. Continuing education contact hours, including Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) contact hours, are available at no additional cost. Your local Planned Parenthood affiliate may also be able to provide in-service training.

National Sex Ed Conference
Sponsored by the Center for Sex Education, this annual conference offers workshops for new and seasoned sex education professionals. (Were you there last week? Tell us how it was!)

CAI (Cicatelli Associates Inc.)
CAI is a training center for NYS DOH AIDS Institute.

Online Training and Webinars

Answer (Rutgers University)
Answer offers online training and capacity building for sex education professionals, including topics such as “Sexuality ABCs” and “Sexual Anatomy and Response,” among many others.

CAPP and PREP Webinars
Find recorded webinars here. Remember to check the CAPP and PREP Training Calendar for upcoming webinars.

Cardea eLearning Courses
While Cardea’s online courses are primarily for clinicians, educators may find value in courses such as “Family Planning Basics,” “Gender Diversity 101,” and “STD 101.”

Office of Adolescent Health: Online Learning Modules
OAH offers several online learning opportunities for organizations in the teen pregnancy prevention and expecting and parenting teen fields, including “Talking with Teens about Reproductive Health” and “Adolescent Development.”

Brushing Up: Brief Reading and Videos

For a more comprehensive list, download the Directory of Professional Development Opportunities in Sexuality Education (Word) from Future of Sex Ed.

Recommendations?

If you have resources to suggest, please comment (or you can email me directly at ks548@cornell.edu).

 

Karen Schantz   – Karen

Farewell, Beth

As you’ve heard by now, Beth Mastro — trainer and TA provider extraordinaire — will not be returning to ACT for Youth. Beth, we will miss you so much! You make everything more fun. You took on tough projects. You are a true collaborator with a wise voice. And then there’s karaoke…

Please stay in touch!

Contraception Basics for Educators: New Resources, Inclusive Language

Earlier this summer, Dr. Taylor Starr presented the information-packed webinar “Contraception Options for Adolescents: Basics for Educators.” While you can find the full recording (including extensive Q&A) on the Shared Resources page, we thought it might be helpful to also break it into bite-size pieces.

To find JUST the method information you are looking for, visit our Contraception page and scroll down to “Methods.” There you will find an edited version of the webinar, along with short excerpts on each method covered.

Remember, these videos are intended for YOU, not for your students. They give background on each method, including how it works, duration, effectiveness, and side effects, all from a clinical perspective. Our hope is that you can use these resources to build your base of knowledge so that you can confidently answer young people’s questions.

Another reference we’ve just updated for your use is Birth Control Methods in Brief (PDF) – just the basic facts, minus side effects. In this new edition I’ve attempted to use language appropriate to all genders. Did I succeed? What would you change or recommend? Do you have resources to share on gender-inclusive language in sex education?

Share your thoughts and resources in the comments, please! You can also direct them to me at ks548@cornell.edu. Your feedback is helpful and much appreciated.

Karen Schantz   -Karen

What Do Youth Think about Birth Control Methods?

A few years back, the Department of Health asked the ACT COE to gather young people’s perspectives on family planning services. With the help of CAPP and PREP providers, we were able to speak with 336 youth in 36 focus groups all over New York State. What we found was, for the most part, not surprising: Many had confidentiality concerns centered around the fear that parents would find out or people would know their business. Youth were afraid of being judged by clinicians and other staff; talking about sex and contraception felt awkward; and clinics did not always seem friendly to youth. There were also fears about getting bad news at a clinic visit.

No surprises there. But to me, one finding did stand out: the overwhelming negative beliefs and attitudes that youth expressed about birth control methods.

Participants were asked to name contraceptive methods that they were aware of and briefly discuss each method. Our researchers counted the number of negative vs. positive remarks made about each contraceptive method – and in nearly every case, the negative comments far outweighed the positive comments.

Negative comments most often referred to side effects they had heard about, as well as perceived lack of reliability. Emergency contraception in particular was considered dangerous – and had five times as many negative comments as positive. The only method where the good edged out the bad? Abstinence. Abstinence was not mentioned as frequently as other methods, but youth clearly understood that it is the most effective way to prevent pregnancy. (It was also largely seen as unrealistic.)

This study is several years old. More recently, researchers in South Carolina* conducted a small focus group study with black and Latina/o youth in two counties. They found many of the same themes: young people expressed the need for private, confidential services in an environment that is friendly to teens. And again, negative feelings about birth control surfaced – especially with respect to side effects. As one teen put it when talking of contraception commercials, “I hate it when they say side effects may include dizziness, drowsiness, heart disease…I say no thank you.”

We know we need to work on the perception and reality of confidential services for youth. At the same time, let’s make sure youth are getting positive messages about birth control. The good news is, they’ve received positive messages about abstinence, and these messages appear to be getting through. How can we present other methods in a positive light as well? Teens who are now or will soon be sexually active do need to know the side effects of any method they are considering, but are they also hearing about convenience, effectiveness, ease of use, and accessibility?

What are your thoughts? Do you have strategies to share? Let us know in the comments.

Karen Schantz– Karen

*Galloway, C. T., Duffy, J. L., Dixon, R. P., & Fuller, T. R. (2017). Exploring African-American and Latino Teens’ Perceptions of Contraception and Access to Reproductive Health Care Services. Journal of Adolescent Health, 60(3, Supplement), S57–S62. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.12.006

You can find more on the ACT for Youth study here: Youth and Family Planning: Findings from a Focus Group Study (PDF)

 

The Hub!

Welcome to The Hub!, the blog of CAPP and PREP providers in New York State. Here the ACT for Youth Center of Excellence (ACT COE) will answer common questions and highlight tools, hot tips, and resources to help you meet your goals. Please comment, post your questions, and share your ideas here too!

A little housekeeping:

  • On your first comment, please include your agency name. (To reduce spam, we need to approve your first comment. After that, comments from your email address will be automatically approved–you’re good to go!)