Using Kahoot! in Evidence-based Programs

In this guest post, Abby Terry, an educator with Mothers and Babies in Binghamton, shares a hot tip!

When presenting our middle school life skills and using a “Jeopardy” style review game, a student suggested we use Kahoot! instead.  We investigated and found that by changing the question format to multiple choice, it would work well and be engaging for all students.  Students were already familiar with the game from other classes and are instantly excited when they hear there will be a Kahoot! 

The level of student excitement and engagement prompted us to put the Myth and Fact activity from Be Proud, Be Responsible into Kahoot! as well.   Immediately, we could see the benefits of every student responding with less time to be influenced by their peers.  We had real-time feedback of what the majority of students understood, or what we would need to clarify.  We are also able to gather trend data from the Kahoot! website by downloading reports.  One hiccup was that we were only able to do this for schools that provide an iPad or tablet for each student.   

We knew that we had to make this available to all students both for the student’s increased excitement and our data collection.  Kahoot! works through an app or the website. We had experience with students using the app, but the app is not available in the Google Play Store, which works with our Kindle Fires.  We didn’t want to allow students open internet access, so we set out to find a work-around.  After some research (involving APK mirrors, etc), we were able to load the Kahoot! app onto all of our Kindle Fires and now we use it at every school for Be Proud, Be Responsible and Making Proud Choices.  It’s even more exciting for the students who don’t have tablet access every day and our results have been fantastic.  For more information about using Kahoot! with evidence-based programs or with Kindle Fires, e-mail aterry@mothersandbabies.org

Abby Terry, Mothers and Babies Perinatal Network

~ Abby Terry,
Mothers and Babies

A word on the Bureau of Women, Infant and Adolescent Health (BWIAH) Provider Meeting

In a few short weeks, NYSDOH will welcome CAPP and PREP providers to Albany for our Bureau-wide two-day provider meeting. It is a great opportunity to hear about emerging public health topics related to priority areas of healthy interpersonal relationships, healthy birth outcomes, and improved pregnancy intention. You will hear from several excellent keynote speakers and attend relevant workshops that can enhance the great work that you do. At the conference, you will connect and exchange ideas with CAPP/PREP providers, other BWIAH provider groups, as well as your DOH program staff and your ACT for Youth team members.

Who should attend?

Attendance is limited to two participants per program. For CAPP and PREP, both Health Educator Supervisors and Health Educators are eligible to participate. We expect that at least one Health Educator Supervisor from each CAPP and PREP program will join us. Many of the workshops are specifically designed for staff that work directly with their program participants.

What does it cost?

The cost is $116 per attendee. Your registration fee will cover continental breakfast and lunch on May 22-23 and an evening reception on May 22.

**Note that no outside food will be allowed at this meeting and there will be presentations during lunch each day.

You are responsible for event registration, hotel, and travel expenses, all of which should have been included in your CAPP or PREP budget.

How do we register?

Register on the event website. For planning purposes, we’ll ask you to select the workshops you wish to attend. You’ll find descriptions of the workshops as well as keynote presentations on the site.

Room blocks have been secured at several Albany hotels. We recommend that you reserve your rooms and register for the event soon as each hotel has an early deadline for the discounted rate.

More information is available on the registration link; if you have any questions about the conference please contact your NYSDOH program liaison or me. We look forward to seeing you at this exciting event!

Eric Zasada

~ Eric Zasada
NYS Department of Health

Teaching pleasure — for the sake of safety, protection and empowerment!

Nika Norvila, CAPP Health Educator at Northwell Health, brings us this perspective. CAPP and PREP providers, please continue the conversation in the comments!

As CAPP and PREP providers we are bound to the evidence-based curricula we are assigned to facilitate. Whether it’s Making Proud Choices! or Be Proud! Be Responsible!, pleasure is not a subject that we delve into very deeply. I am not trying to advocate for the re-vamping of our EBPs or for educators to make any red-light adaptations, but rather for educators to consider the value of including pleasure in the conversations we have with our students, whether it is in one-on-one sessions, add-on sessions after EBP cycles, or–for the lucky few–workshops and group activities in our own spaces.

As health educators we are worried about unintended pregnancies, STDs, and HIV–which are all very important and valid for youth. However, when we think about why a lot of people have sex, including adults, the most common reason is for pleasure. People have sex because sex (hopefully to some degree, most of the time, for most people) feels good. To ignore this aspect of sex when teaching about sex seems unfair to the young people who are curious and well-deserving of truthful information about the ever present topic of sex and sexuality.

Some studies have shown that teaching youth about sexual pleasure and treating them like sexually autonomous beings allows them to feel like responsible sexual agents who need to take responsibility for adult things, like having sex.

In her book Girls & Sex (2016), through over seventy interviews with young women across the U.S., Peggy Orenstein explores the current of sex and sexuality. Orenstein writes, “If girls are unable to advocate for their own pleasure, they are also less likely to feel able to advocate for their own safety. Emphasizing male pleasure, especially without teaching about consent, perpetuates rape culture. Pain or uncomfortable sexual encounters are normalized for girls and women. In all kinds of ways, we expect women to be complacent in their discomfort.”

Teaching teens, but particularly teaching young women and girls, about pleasure–which historically has been intentionally dismissed and ignored–can not only led to better sex, but to safer sex, and to more empowered girls and women inside AND outside the bedroom.

Without re-vamping our EBPs, how can health educators incorporate pleasure into conversations and lessons with our students without taking away the intended messages of the EBPs? Would talking to students about pleasure detract from any of our safe sex messages, or simply make them stronger, if there is a link between pleasure, consent and safety? Can’t we hope that new messages of pleasure for women and girls will empower them? By learning about the clitoris and encouraging adolescents to explore their bodies, to learn what feels good, what doesn’t feel good, and where their boundaries are, leave them feeling empowered to only seek sexual encounters that feel good to them, instead of feeling only pressured to perform and please their male partners?

Please share your thoughts, questions and comments. You can also email me: nnorvila@northwell.edu

Nika Norvila – Nika Norvila, Northwell Health

Farewell, Divine!

As many of you have heard, Divine has accepted an exciting new position at Binghamton University and will be leaving us at the end of this week.

Having served on both the Evaluation and TA/Training teams, Divine is a true team player who has contributed enormously to our work. She has always been willing to stretch to meet new challenges. We’ll miss her thoughtful insights, warmth, steadiness — and her infectious laugh!

We are happy for you, Divine, but we will miss you so much!

– The ACT for Youth team

Mary, Divine, Michele, and Heather at Provider Day in Albany, 2016

 

Sara, Heather, Ravhee, Divine, Michele in Albany, 2014

Divine and Brian in Kennedy office, 2013

Brian, Divine, Christy, Jenny working in conference room, 2014

Michele, Divine 2017

Beth, Michele, Divine, and Heather, 2017

HIV Prevention and Education: PrEP, PEP, and U=U

Christopher Culp, Outreach and Education Specialist at Planned Parenthood of Central & Western New York, sent us this post to open discussion among CAPP and PREP colleagues. Please comment to continue the conversation!

Be Proud! Be Responsible! is an HIV prevention curriculum and it contains a lot of information about HIV.  Yet, even with the 2016 version, there are some new and exciting shifts in HIV prevention that are missed.  Three of those are PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis), PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis), and U=U (Undetectable=Untransmittable).  These three are key tools in HIV prevention and education toolbox, specifically empowering people to take control of their sexual health and fight against stigma.  This is especially important as New York State carries out its Ending the Epidemic initiative for 2020.

I know that we all teach from various backgrounds and experiences.  I was wondering if we could have a discussion based on these advancements to perhaps support each other in developing well-rounded education and referrals for the youth we work with.  I’d like to start off with a few questions and see where people are in incorporating PrEP, PEP, and U=U into their programming.

1) Do you talk about PrEP in your programming (an adaptation)?

2) Do you talk about PEP in your programming (an adaptation)?

3) Do you talk about U=U in your programming (an adaptation)?  (This can be sensitive, as some organizations have not signed onto the U=U consensus, though NYS has.)

4) Do you think there is value in including one or more of the above topics in your adaptations?

5) If you do include these, do you face any challenges in teaching or incorporating it into your programs?

6) How easy is it to have a list of referrals for youth that are interested in PrEP, PEP, or U=U in your community?

7) Do you make any adaptations to directly address HIV stigma? If so, what are they?

Thank you all.  Please feel free to email me directly if you have questions – christopher.culp@ppcwny.org

  – Christopher Culp

Find more about PrEP and PEP here on the HIV/AIDS page.

Learn about U=U from the Prevention Access Campaign.

How Are You Using Incentives?

We asked Jessie Moore, Director of Sexuality Education at Planned Parenthood Mid-Hudson Valley, to talk about her experience trying out different incentives. Let us know in the comments what works and doesn’t work for your program, too!

Our CAPP program has been offering $25 gift cards for 100% completion and $10 gift cards for 75% program completion as EBP incentives. The only problem is that it isn’t often that we are giving out the $10 ones and purchasing them becomes a hassle. What are others doing? Only giving an incentive for 100%? Giving $25 for 75-100% completion? Just curious. We’re thinking about getting rid of the $10 card all together.

Also, this might be useful for some. We have found that using generic gift cards for stores like Walmart or Target was not as successful. When we have chosen to promote sneakers (Finish Line or Foot Locker), teen girl fashion (Forever 21), or video games (GameStop), we see an increase in interest. Going after gamers opened an entirely untapped audience for us!

You can now find the Incentives Guidance (Word) from DOH at the bottom of the EBP Implementation page.

  – Jessie Moore

 

Getting More from Your Kindle

We invited Gilbert Wu, Health Educator Supervisor at the Chinese-American Planning Council, to share his ideas on using Kindles creatively. Thank you, Gilbert! We’d love to hear your ideas, too–please share them in the comments.

Our PREP program requires that all entry and exit surveys be distributed to the participants during the start and finish of an EBP. The amazing thing is that the surveys can be answered through the use of Amazon Kindle Fires. However, when we were finished with using the Kindles we would just pack the Kindles away until the next use.

Kindles are Under-Utilized

We thought about how we have such a great resource but it is extremely underused. We can definitely make more use of the Kindles other than just data collection. Rather than having the Kindles stored away only for survey use, we can try to find ways to use them during our lessons. The participants can get to experience different kinds of learning styles with the Kindles; we just have to take advantage of the valuable technology we have right now. Therefore we decided to be resourceful by utilizing the Kindles in our lessons whenever we possibly can.

Getting Birth Control Information

One way we use the Kindles involves an adaptation to the birth control activity. In our adaptation, we have the participants research the information online instead of just listening to a lecture. When we unlock the Silk browser app, this lets the participants go online to look up the information about birth control. We have the participants read out to each other the answers that they have found, and the educators make sure the key information is shared. This helps create an environment where we can reassure that the information is correct and at the same time help the participants learn through their own gathering of information.

Adult Preparation Activities

We use the Kindles in our adulthood preparation workshops as well. In our financial literacy workshop “Budgeting to live on your own,” we utilize the Kindles by having the participants search for furnishing costs. The students are presented a scenario where there is a monthly income budget and need to pair up as roommates in order to live on their own. This group activity involves the participants keeping a budget while searching the cost of furnishing a room. They use the web browser to search for their preferred retailers, researching their best cost-effective methods for living realistically and comfortably. The possibilities of Kindle use can be endless, and it can go further as long as we are creative about the uses of Kindles.

Handle with Care!

Of course we have to take care of the Kindles as well. We have to ensure that they are all fully charged, functioning, and able to connect to a working internet connection, and we make sure that the parental controls are working. With the frequent use of the Kindles, we have to be handle them carefully to be sure that the precious equipment is working. We also have to take measures to ensure that they have covers for protection.

So I recommend to those who have the Kindles to take advantage of their versatility and to make full use when possible. We live in a modern age where our youth are constantly learning through the use of technology and this is a chance to provide that kind of experience. Best of luck to everyone!

  – Gilbert Wu

Use Your Power(points) for Good, not Evil!

Many of you are using PowerPoint slides to support implementation of BPBR or MPC. We’re seeing a lot of positive uses of PowerPoint, but also some uses that concern us. So your TA Team brainstormed a few DOs and DON’Ts for your consideration.

DO use PowerPoint:

  • To help you keep the program on point and structured. Having PowerPoint slides up in the background of the action can help you and participants stay on track.
  • To display instructions for an activity so that you don’t have to repeat the instructions 40 times!
  • To make images – such as birth control methods — more visible (but see below about STDs!)
  • To reinforce messages or information – displaying answers to certain activities, such as Calling Koko or condom use steps.

DON’T use PowerPoint:

  • To replace interacting with participants. Think about how you feel when you’re in a workshop and the presenter starts reading a lot of text from PowerPoint slides. Personally, we’d prefer to stick our collective head under a blanket and have a nice nap. PowerPoint is usually not very engaging! Your interaction with young people, and theirs with you and with each other, is what makes the program engaging. When programs are less interactive, they’re less effective, too.
  • For group agreements. The group agreements should be brainstormed together, and posted where they can be seen and referenced at each session–a great technique for keeping group sessions on track (PDF). Putting them on a PowerPoint slide as part of a longer presentation keeps them hidden from view for most of the session.
  • For brainstorming. You don’t want to pre-fill a slide representing a brainstorm–that could undermine the participants’ sense that what they say matters. We recommend sticking to good, old-fashioned flip charts. If you can’t use a flip chart, project a blank page (such as a Word document) for the brainstorm and type the ideas in, then return to the PowerPoint when the brainstorm text is no longer needed.
  • To project photos of STDs. Gross and scary photos of STDs may get a big reaction from participants, but are not effective as a way to motivate healthy behaviors in the long run (see #3 in this ETR post for more on this topic). They also shame and stigmatize people who have STDs.

In short, PowerPoint can be helpful as a supplement, keeping things moving where you want them to go, but your students will thank you if you do NOT use them as a primary teaching tool.

Friendly reminder: Using PowerPoint is an adaptation, so be sure to run it by your TA support person.

 

– Divine, Beth, Michele, Heather, & Jutta

My Sex Education

Cornell student Hadiyah Chowdhury, who has been working with the ACT COE this summer, has a particular interest in how students from different cultures do or do not benefit from the sex education they receive in schools. Although her own high school sex ed was not evidence-based, we asked her to share her experiences of sexual health education in a small upstate city.

I was born and brought up in Corning NY, a town of approximately 40,000 people, 92% of whom are white. My parents immigrated to the United States as graduate students from Bangladesh in 1987. I grew up speaking fluent Bengali until the time came for me to go to school and I forgot all my Bengali. The specifics of my upbringing may not resonate with too many people, but I have a feeling that many people reading might be feeling a sense of familiarity. When I was 11 my family and I moved to Paris where we lived for three years before moving back to Corning. The culture shock I experienced when I moved back to the States at age 14 was confusing to say the least.

In order to get a sense of what I was feeling, it becomes necessary to understand Corning as a town. Corning is a company town, meaning that your parents either work for Corning Incorporated (a company that produces glass) or they do not. The rich and poor of Corning, New York can be described as simply as that. This very visible and obvious distinction led to an extremely stratified high school experience: you had the honor’s kids on one hand, who only took AP classes and whose parents exclusively worked for Corning, and the regents kids (or “dirts” as they were called by some) whose parents did not. Because of this distinction, I pretty much cycled through the same group of 15-20 kids in all of my classes in high school. The only exceptions to this rule were PE and health class.

My health class had a total of seven students, only three of which I had interacted with before. As was the case in most of my other classes, I was not only the only South Asian person in the class, but also the only person of color. I remember being apprehensive of the class (as many teenagers are) not only because I thought some of the discussions in the class would be uncomfortable, but also because I didn’t know how my thoughts and ideas would be perceived by others based on the color of my skin. See, the problem was not that my parents were conservative when it came to sex, the problem was that I was not. Despite my apprehension, I found health class to be a place where I could express my thoughts about relationships, sex, and health more generally in a fairly intimate way. I remember my teacher had us sit on the floor in a circle and led us into rather unstructured, facilitated discussions. This method worked well because of the small class size and the way the instructor facilitated conversation between us, even though we definitely disagreed about many of the topics she had us discuss. I never felt attacked because of my skin color or my more liberal opinions about relationships and sex. This was pleasantly surprising to me since I was uncomfortably aware that I was perceived as different by most people at school. Not a day went by that someone wouldn’t make some comment about how my liberal opinion on some topic was no doubt due to the “chocolate” color of my skin. Health class was something of a refuge from these kinds of comments.

I must give credit to the instructor: she worked at a rape crisis center and a rehabilitation center for individuals addicted to meth and cocaine before coming to my high school. She obviously had to be able to manage rooms full of people from different backgrounds. She was easily able to contact Planned Parenthood to come and do two workshops for us, one on different forms of contraception and another on abusive relationships.

I looked forward to health class every day because I knew the instructor would handle disagreement well while also allowing us to be honest about our opinions. It was only when I came to college that I realized that this was not everyone else’s sex ed experience. Many people had to deal with instructors who would slut-shame, or preach abstinence only to classrooms. Some people told me that they were terrified of engaging in sex for fear of becoming pregnant or getting an STI after going through sex ed in high school. Others told me they had no kind of sex ed at all in school. While sex ed wasn’t perfect in Corning, I at least felt that I had access to useful resources. My health class focused on the mechanics of heterosexual, penetrative sex and tended to ignore topics around gender (specifically gender-non-conforming people) and attraction. However, since I felt that I knew where to go if I had questions, I think my sex ed ended up being quite comprehensive. In addition, my instructor made it clear that sex can be really emotionally or physically painful for some people, forcing me to conceptualize my ideas about sex in a different way. This class also became the beginnings of my interest in feminism and gender theory more broadly.

So in general, I am very grateful for the way health class was conducted in my rural, upstate high school and I recognize I was very lucky to have such a good instructor. The way she handled cultural differences in the classroom was respectful and allowed me to feel very comfortable while discussing topics that weren’t necessarily very easy to talk about.

 

– Hadiyah Chowdhury

Hadiyah Chowdhury is studying Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies as well as Anthropology at Cornell University.