The time for CAPP observations has come!

Some of you may remember that ACT for Youth used to set up visits to observe CAPP educators implementing a module of their evidence-based program. The main goal of observations was to assess the quality of program facilitation. We have not done CAPP observations yet in this new funding cycle. But as before, the grant requires ACT for Youth to do one observation per project within the funding cycle. Since you are in year 3, the time has come to start scheduling observations.

Currently, PREP providers are used to annual observation visits by ACT for Youth. And so are the providers who implement TOP. In their case it is part of the licensing requirements set by Wyman.

What can you expect?

The TA/Evaluation support teams will contact Health Educator Supervisors to schedule an observation visit. We will ask you about dates and times of current EBP cycles. We usually avoid observing the first and last sessions. We will negotiate the best time with you and your educator and work out the logistics (meeting time, place, etc.). We will use the facilitator observation form that is available on the Observation Protocols and Tools page.

What happens afterwards?

After the observation we will be available for some immediate feedback. Two days after the observation we will send the observation report to the Health Educator Supervisor and the DOH Program Advisor. If the report indicates the need for facilitation improvement, we will be available to provide support and guidance.

Next steps

We will start contacting Health Educator Supervisors to schedule observations before schools let out. Obviously we won’t be able to do all of the CAPP projects this year. Some of you will hear from us in the fall or next year. If you have any questions please let us know.

~ Jutta

ACT for Youth TA/Evaluation Support Team: Michele, Jenny, Marisol, Jutta, Mandy, Brian, and Heather
ACT for Youth TA/Evaluation Support Team:
Michele, Jenny, Marisol, Jutta, Mandy, Brian, and Heather

Using Kahoot! in Evidence-based Programs

In this guest post, Abby Terry, an educator with Mothers and Babies in Binghamton, shares a hot tip!

When presenting our middle school life skills and using a “Jeopardy” style review game, a student suggested we use Kahoot! instead.  We investigated and found that by changing the question format to multiple choice, it would work well and be engaging for all students.  Students were already familiar with the game from other classes and are instantly excited when they hear there will be a Kahoot! 

The level of student excitement and engagement prompted us to put the Myth and Fact activity from Be Proud, Be Responsible into Kahoot! as well.   Immediately, we could see the benefits of every student responding with less time to be influenced by their peers.  We had real-time feedback of what the majority of students understood, or what we would need to clarify.  We are also able to gather trend data from the Kahoot! website by downloading reports.  One hiccup was that we were only able to do this for schools that provide an iPad or tablet for each student.   

We knew that we had to make this available to all students both for the student’s increased excitement and our data collection.  Kahoot! works through an app or the website. We had experience with students using the app, but the app is not available in the Google Play Store, which works with our Kindle Fires.  We didn’t want to allow students open internet access, so we set out to find a work-around.  After some research (involving APK mirrors, etc), we were able to load the Kahoot! app onto all of our Kindle Fires and now we use it at every school for Be Proud, Be Responsible and Making Proud Choices.  It’s even more exciting for the students who don’t have tablet access every day and our results have been fantastic.  For more information about using Kahoot! with evidence-based programs or with Kindle Fires, e-mail aterry@mothersandbabies.org

Abby Terry, Mothers and Babies Perinatal Network

~ Abby Terry,
Mothers and Babies