BASIC Training

In any profession, it can be easy to fall into the trap of telling yourself you know/have seen or can do it all, if you’ve done it long enough. As a trainer and facilitator, part of the way that I counter this is to look for places to be a participant as often as my schedule allows.

So when I had the opportunity to attend the “Inclusive Excellence Summit” at Cornell recently, I went all in. When we did introductions and they asked “why are you here?” my answer was an enthusiastic “to learn and to participate.” All of the activities and conversations, even the ones I’ve facilitated before, I completed as someone who had not. When I go in with this mindset, it allows me to be more reflective of my own work and be open to new ideas.

As a woman of color, I know all too often “diversity” and “inclusion” can often focus on people who look like me. And while I appreciate and applaud these efforts, it can end up actually narrowing that concept of “inclusion” and become almost counter-productive if we (I) am not careful.

Luckily, this summit did a good job covering a lot in a small amount of time and allowed me to think more broadly about inclusion beyond my own story and experience. One of the first things I wrote down came from when we did our group agreements, the main one being: Be BASIC.

B– Broaden your perspective.

A– Ask questions. Specifically within this group, ask yourself “who is being left out of the conversation”.

S– Struggle–and then Stick with it.

I– Intentionality is key.

C– Construct new spaces and dialogues.

Having group agreements that were purposeful and that encouraged us to think “bigger” was a great way to start things off. It also allowed me to start thinking about our own trainings and ask “how can we be more inclusive?”

One of the first things that came to mind was that during the registration process for workshops or trainings, we don’t ask if people have any special training needs. Folks sometimes let us know the day they walk in, but having to take that initiative can be intimidating for them or feel like more work, especially if they’ve just taken two trains and a bus to get to us.

Asking weeks beforehand could also allow us, the trainers, to prepare activities differently, arrange the room in a more accommodating way or just simply be more aware.

Listening to speakers with varying abilities during this summit not only made me realize things I may take for granted, but also gave me tangible solutions for addressing these things.

What do you think? What ways could we be more inclusive? What ways could your own program be more inclusive?

image of Heather smiling

~ Heather

What did CAPP and PREP providers think about the 2019 BWIAH Provider Meeting?

We crunched the numbers on your evaluation of the 2019 BWIAH Provider Meeting. Here’s what the 50+ CAPP and PREP providers who answered these questions had to say:

You were kind to us about registration.

We didn’t need evaluations to know that the registration process needs a new approach – but you were remarkably tolerant!

You liked the Albany Capital Center.

94% of those who answered this question agreed that the Albany Capital Center worked well as the event venue. There was one caveat that was probably mentioned more than any other comment: it was too cold. A few people who were unable to stay nearby missed the convenience of having it at a hotel or at least having the event within walking distance. The inexpensive parking was appreciated.

You were happy that food was provided this year, though it should have included protein options at breakfast, coffee and tea in the afternoon, and water in each room.

Structure & Timing

While some loved the start and end times, others did not. Some of you would lengthen the event overall while others would shorten it; some wanted longer workshops and others wanted shorter ones.

But certain messages came through clearly: Build in more breaks! Having two working lunches was really too much, and Day One was long and packed. The networking reception was a highlight for many participants, but it came at the end of a long day. Many of you would have liked more time for networking.

Content

  • We heard many positive comments on the keynotes—particularly Amy Cunningham’s talk on self-care. Some did not like the political slant of Loretta Ross’s presentation, but overall, most of you were happy with the keynotes.
  • Workshops could have been more interactive – there was too much sitting. Many people were happy with the range of topics, and many of the workshops got high marks.
  • The CAPP and PREP provider group meeting was another highlight. Many of you loved the discussion and would have liked to have more of it.

Let’s cut to the chase. Was it a good use of your time?

YES. The vast majority of those who responded to this question
– 98% – agreed that it was time well spent. One person was neutral and several people who completed other questions skipped this one. Either they were unsure or just didn’t want to hurt our feelings!

It makes a difference!

We anticipate being able to offer another Provider Meeting in 2020 or 2021. Rest assured your feedback is already helping us make changes for the next event. Our thanks go to everyone who took the time to complete the evaluations—it DOES make a difference!

If you have anything to add about the 2019 Provider Meeting or the kind of event you would like to see in the future, please let us know in the comments!

Karen Schantz

~ Karen

The time for CAPP observations has come!

Some of you may remember that ACT for Youth used to set up visits to observe CAPP educators implementing a module of their evidence-based program. The main goal of observations was to assess the quality of program facilitation. We have not done CAPP observations yet in this new funding cycle. But as before, the grant requires ACT for Youth to do one observation per project within the funding cycle. Since you are in year 3, the time has come to start scheduling observations.

Currently, PREP providers are used to annual observation visits by ACT for Youth. And so are the providers who implement TOP. In their case it is part of the licensing requirements set by Wyman.

What can you expect?

The TA/Evaluation support teams will contact Health Educator Supervisors to schedule an observation visit. We will ask you about dates and times of current EBP cycles. We usually avoid observing the first and last sessions. We will negotiate the best time with you and your educator and work out the logistics (meeting time, place, etc.). We will use the facilitator observation form that is available on the Observation Protocols and Tools page.

What happens afterwards?

After the observation we will be available for some immediate feedback. Two days after the observation we will send the observation report to the Health Educator Supervisor and the DOH Program Advisor. If the report indicates the need for facilitation improvement, we will be available to provide support and guidance.

Next steps

We will start contacting Health Educator Supervisors to schedule observations before schools let out. Obviously we won’t be able to do all of the CAPP projects this year. Some of you will hear from us in the fall or next year. If you have any questions please let us know.

~ Jutta

ACT for Youth TA/Evaluation Support Team: Michele, Jenny, Marisol, Jutta, Mandy, Brian, and Heather
ACT for Youth TA/Evaluation Support Team:
Michele, Jenny, Marisol, Jutta, Mandy, Brian, and Heather

Using Kahoot! in Evidence-based Programs

In this guest post, Abby Terry, an educator with Mothers and Babies in Binghamton, shares a hot tip!

When presenting our middle school life skills and using a “Jeopardy” style review game, a student suggested we use Kahoot! instead.  We investigated and found that by changing the question format to multiple choice, it would work well and be engaging for all students.  Students were already familiar with the game from other classes and are instantly excited when they hear there will be a Kahoot! 

The level of student excitement and engagement prompted us to put the Myth and Fact activity from Be Proud, Be Responsible into Kahoot! as well.   Immediately, we could see the benefits of every student responding with less time to be influenced by their peers.  We had real-time feedback of what the majority of students understood, or what we would need to clarify.  We are also able to gather trend data from the Kahoot! website by downloading reports.  One hiccup was that we were only able to do this for schools that provide an iPad or tablet for each student.   

We knew that we had to make this available to all students both for the student’s increased excitement and our data collection.  Kahoot! works through an app or the website. We had experience with students using the app, but the app is not available in the Google Play Store, which works with our Kindle Fires.  We didn’t want to allow students open internet access, so we set out to find a work-around.  After some research (involving APK mirrors, etc), we were able to load the Kahoot! app onto all of our Kindle Fires and now we use it at every school for Be Proud, Be Responsible and Making Proud Choices.  It’s even more exciting for the students who don’t have tablet access every day and our results have been fantastic.  For more information about using Kahoot! with evidence-based programs or with Kindle Fires, e-mail aterry@mothersandbabies.org

Abby Terry, Mothers and Babies Perinatal Network

~ Abby Terry,
Mothers and Babies

Farewell and Good Luck, Sara!

The word is out…Sara is leaving us this week and headed to an amazing new job with Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

For 11 years, Sara has done incredible work as a researcher and with the ACT for Youth Evaluation Team and beloved mentor for the ACT Youth Network.   Through her skill and humor, Sara has been able to connect with providers by helping them navigate the world of evaluation, tablets, surveys and everyone’s favorite…ORS.  In addition to her own family, Sara has been an integral part of our family here at Cornell.  Her dedication to the work, her commitment to reproductive justice and her endearing personality make her one-of-a-kind.

Sara, your work with Cornell, in general, and the ACT Team, specifically, has been invaluable.  Planned Parenthood’s gain is our loss, but we are beyond excited for as you embark on this new endeavor.  We will miss you tremendously!

~ the ACT for Youth team

Sara at Youth Network meetiing, June 2016
Sara and Michele with Youth Network members in Albany, 2011
Sara and Michele, 2011
Sara, Heather, Divine, and Michele with Ravhee
Sara and Michele with Youth Network participants

The Learning Collaborative for Supervisors Is Starting Up Again!

Last year we held a series of meetings for supervisors to explore their responsibilities and tasks. We discussed challenges and best practices, and many of you shared your own experiences, challenges, and effective strategies. We covered a range of topics such as new educator orientation and professional development, team management, handling personality conflicts, community outreach, and recruiting new sites.

New supervisors have joined the ranks of CAPP and PREP since then. We would like to start up a new series of online learning collaborative meetings for supervisors in April. Following last year’s model we’ll start with an overview of effective supervisory strategies for CAPP and PREP. Next we will identify issues supervisors are interested in, and based on those interests we will offer monthly meetings via Zoom, providing best practice strategies and an opportunity for supervisors to learn from each other.

Learning Collaboratives work best if we have a diverse group of people involved, from supervisors new on the job to very experienced and seasoned supervisors.

Please join us for the first Supervisor Learning Collaborative Meeting on April 22 at 1:00PM. Stay tuned! Registration and additional information will follow soon.

Jutta Dotterweich

~ Jutta

A word on the Bureau of Women, Infant and Adolescent Health (BWIAH) Provider Meeting

In a few short weeks, NYSDOH will welcome CAPP and PREP providers to Albany for our Bureau-wide two-day provider meeting. It is a great opportunity to hear about emerging public health topics related to priority areas of healthy interpersonal relationships, healthy birth outcomes, and improved pregnancy intention. You will hear from several excellent keynote speakers and attend relevant workshops that can enhance the great work that you do. At the conference, you will connect and exchange ideas with CAPP/PREP providers, other BWIAH provider groups, as well as your DOH program staff and your ACT for Youth team members.

Who should attend?

Attendance is limited to two participants per program. For CAPP and PREP, both Health Educator Supervisors and Health Educators are eligible to participate. We expect that at least one Health Educator Supervisor from each CAPP and PREP program will join us. Many of the workshops are specifically designed for staff that work directly with their program participants.

What does it cost?

The cost is $116 per attendee. Your registration fee will cover continental breakfast and lunch on May 22-23 and an evening reception on May 22.

**Note that no outside food will be allowed at this meeting and there will be presentations during lunch each day.

You are responsible for event registration, hotel, and travel expenses, all of which should have been included in your CAPP or PREP budget.

How do we register?

Register on the event website. For planning purposes, we’ll ask you to select the workshops you wish to attend. You’ll find descriptions of the workshops as well as keynote presentations on the site.

Room blocks have been secured at several Albany hotels. We recommend that you reserve your rooms and register for the event soon as each hotel has an early deadline for the discounted rate.

More information is available on the registration link; if you have any questions about the conference please contact your NYSDOH program liaison or me. We look forward to seeing you at this exciting event!

Eric Zasada

~ Eric Zasada
NYS Department of Health

Training Events for 2019

Have you noticed that the CAPP and PREP training calendar for 2019 is posted on the website? If not, take a look!

If you are a Health Educator Supervisor the training calendar will assist you in planning professional development for your educators, in particular newly hired educators. Keep in mind which trainings are mandatory and which ones are recommended. (You can find that on Working with ACT for Youth — scroll down to the table.)

A few gaps…

One mandatory training, the Training of Educators for Project AIM, still needs to be confirmed. Most likely it will be offered in May. A few webinars are still under development as well. We will update the calendar as soon as possible. Not listed are learning community meetings such as the ones for the Supervisor Learning Collaborative or Component 2 Providers.  We will send separate notices for these events.

Exciting News!

We are developing a couple of new workshops this year:

  • Gender and Sexuality
  • Creating Inclusive Program Environments for Youth with Different Abilities

ORS drop-in sessions are new as well. The evaluation team has scheduled quarterly drop-in web sessions for folks who have questions about online reporting system and/or want to fine-tune their skills using the ORS.

Registration Changes

As usual we will send out registration notices a month prior to workshops and trainings. We will be moving towards an online registration process. Stay tuned for that.

We are looking forward to a productive 2019 training year!

Jutta Dotterweich

— Jutta

How are we doing?

As you know, we at ACT for Youth love to evaluate things and collect data. We are very interested in finding out what you are doing and how you are doing it.

Now we want to flip these questions and ask: How are we doing? Are we helpful? How can we be more helpful? Some of you may remember that a few years ago in first round of CAPP we asked you questions like that to evaluate our center and services. This time we have a slightly different plan.

Trainings first!

We have changed our training feedback form, as you may have noticed. We are asking a few different questions, mostly trying to gauge how well training content and resources can be applied to your work. Thank you all for filling out these open-ended questions.

Over the next few months we will contact participants of our core trainings–Training of Educators, Facilitation Fundamentals, Supervisor Training, Teaching Anatomy and Reproduction, and PYD 101–and conduct a brief interview to see if the trainings have been effective in enhancing your capacity to deliver evidence-based programs and meet other CAPP and PREP objectives.

Technical Assistance next!

Next year we will focus on assessing our TA approach. We are still developing ideas and approaches on how to do that. If you have any suggestions, please let us know.

In the meantime, we hope you will provide us with BRUTALLY HONEST and constructive feedback.

 

– Jutta